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From Kremmling into the Abyss

20160716_073652clone tag: -7240152025310181312IMG_2687-800x600IMG_2675-800x60020160720_190404-1-800x634-800x63420160722_140656-800x480IMG_2502-800x533IMG_2506-800x533img073img072img071img070On 7-16-2016, I left Kremmling for Silverthrone. I followed the official Great Divide Route which is hard packed gravel. There were some climbs but nothing that required me to push my bike. At the Williams Fork Reservoir I spent time near this osprey nest where a mother and her offspring were popping their heads up. The male was flying around but wouldn’t get close to the nest for a decent photo op. I gave up and rode on.

Some time later, before the Ute Pass, I met two cyclists who were riding South to North. One worked for a radio station and recorded an interview with me. I recommended the Williams Reservoir for camping. I summited Ute Pass, after a number of stops to catch my breath, but couldn’t find a sign to take a selfie like I did on Gore Pass.Going over Ute Pass is the last thing I remember about the ride to Silverthrone. The next thing that I remember is lying in a hospital bed at St Anthony’s just outside of Denver where I stayed until my release on Friday 7-22-2016.

Overall, I had excellent care and the food was ☆☆☆☆☆. The only pain I experienced was with my chest, especially, when I cough. This is the price one pays when their life is saved with CPR. Sgt. Dunaway, who performed the CPR, thought she might have broke one of my ribs because she heard a popping sound. No big deal. Hopefully, the reports from the hospital and from the sheriffs that I included,  are legible.</p> <p>Sgt. Dunaway reported in a phone conversation on 7-22-16 that she was driving on State Hwy. 9 when she observed me falling off my bike onto the sidewalk and didn’t move.  She made a u-turn and when arrived at the scene a “doctor” was administrating CPR. Sgt. Dunaway took over and continued CPR for around five minutes until I was breathing and had a pulse. I gave my heartfelt thanks to Sgt. Dunaway.
The reason I was in the hospital for over five days was due to the bureaucracy in getting me a Life Vest, which is a wearable cardioverter defibrillator. In brief, it gives one’s heart a treatment (shock) when it senses that is what it needs.</p> <p>You’ll notice that I was given a discharge diagnosis of Intraventricular hemorrhage. They found blood on my brain, which was probably the result of me falling. I experienced a cardiac arrest, a sudden, unexpected loss of heart function, breathing, and consciousness.
I’m currently at my older son, Kenny’s home in Ft. Collins, Colorado, taking it easy. When I went to put my shirt on at the hospital I was surprised and had to laugh at the condition it was in…like it went through a shredding machine. It is testimony to what I went through.
I’ve included some photos from the hospital and one with my bike and trailer in police storage. I’ll be returning home sometime this week. O the luck of the Polish.

2 observations on “From Kremmling into the Abyss
  1. Phyllis

    I thank god that you were found in time and all ended well, considering the horrendous events. Beautiful photos, of course. So glad Carl history and art are still on n the making. It’s quite the adventure. The vest is quite stylish and you wear it well.

     
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  2. Kristi Pytlinski

    Sounds like someone was watching out for you. Keith and I were praying for your safety. Thankful helpers came to the rescue. Glad to see you smile and feeling better.

     
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